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    Late night vegan chocolate cake mix snack

    Posted in blogjune
    June 30th, 2013


    I started to make a cake earlier in the day, but the raw mixture/batter always tastes better than the cooked product (unless you use coconut oil or cocoa butter, then the cooked cake is perfection). So it didn’t reach the oven.


    It’s great as a late night pick-me-up, chocolate body paint (I guess?) or maybe even porridge topping.

    I wouldn’t say it’s 100%, but as Genevieve says, “What the world needs is not another recipe for cake but the perfection of edible dough!”. Surely a worthwhile mission. I’m a big fan of raw Anzac biscuit dough, which may make it closer to perfection next time.



    Vegan cake mix, no cooking required!

    (could be rebranded as “Vegan chocolate pudding”)


    Based on Mandy Stone’s Vegan Chocolate Cake from Martha Stewart, but halved (approximately) to try and modify dough intake.



    Vegan cake mix snack

    Vegan cake mix snack




    1/3 cup hazelnut meal

    1 cup of white flour (or coconut flour)

    1/3 cup cocoa powder

    1 teaspoon bicarb soda

    ½ teaspoon salt

    1 cup sugar

    2/3 cup melted vegan margarine

    good dash of vanilla essence

    2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar

    1/3 cup desiccated coconut

    1/8 cup cacao nibs

    1/3 cup chopped walnuts





    Mix hazelnut meal, flour, cocoa powder, bicarb soda, salt and sugar.


    Add melted vegan margarine, vanilla essence, and apple cider vinegar. Mix quickly.


    Add desiccated coconut, cacao nibs, chopped walnuts.


    Present a sundae glass (fancy!), or if we share slobbiness, eat out of the mixing bowl. I am normally against this, but you could double dip your spoon if you want to mark it as your private eating territory. Top with coconut cream if you need to wind back the sugary taste.



    Avoid the temptation to add coconut essence – it is often made of glycerine which can be derived from animal fat.


    My tummy hurts from eating too much cake mix – if I had cooked it I would have eaten less, but with 30% less enjoyment. Tummy and willpower need to talk.



    Ways to regain a sense of balance

    April 3rd, 2012


    Relieve stress, feel more balanced and resolve creative blocks by being “in the moment”.

    Use all your senses to connect with the world.

    This lifestyle choice is ably explained by Fiona and Kaspa of the Small stones project.


    Here are some of my ideas for being present, relaxed and appreciative of the environment around us:


    Make a list – a useful strategy, except in powerpoint presentations.

    If you can’t sleep, write down all your thoughts on a notepad next to your bed.

    This also helps to improve concentration on a single task.

    Artist Hannah Bertram has even has a List Makers Project about how to make lists and the people that create lists.



    Take a walk and enjoy the flowers in your neighbourhood, and remember to leave some for others to admire.


    Flannel flowers growing in New South Wales.

    Appreciate native plants without picking them, particularly in national parks.

    If you desperately need to take a cutting from a geranium, remember to maintain the plant’s architectural poise.



    Find an art gallery in your local area, visit your cultural precinct or do some drawing.



    Read an old issue of National Geographic instead of a fashion magazine.

    Feel the quality of the paper and enjoy the beauty of the photographs.



    Update your keyboard. The new keys will have a luscious grippy texture and make typing feel exciting again.


    The impact of this may seem exaggerated, but it’s similar to music improving everyday activities.

    ABC Classic FM had an excellent “Ironing is wonderful” promotion which illustrated this concept.


    Duncan Macleod has written a lovely summary of the chores-music advertising.


    Remember to recycle your old keyboard, or give it to a friend in a bundle with some homemade biscuits.

    That way they won’t  feel too sad about having a non-grippy textured keyboard (or they can fill the key valleys with crumbs).



    Notice more birds in everyday life.

    Donald and Molly Trounson have written a comprehensive and fully illustrated guide for bird observation and education.


    Wrens from Trounson's Australian Birds (2nd ed., 1989, PR Books, Frenchs Forest N.S.W., p. 109).


    It is Australian birds: an index of 864 photographs simply classified for easy identification.

    The wrens’ brilliant blues really jumped off the page, but the colour seems less astounding in a reproduction of a reproduction.


    Check for a copy of Australian birds at a library near you.


    Or listen to the birdcalls from the Australian National Wildlife Collection.



    Use satin pillowcases and change your bedlinen for a more restful sleep.



    Make another list …if that will help.